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SAFETY BULLETIN – OCTOBER 2013

Have you inspected your PPE lately? You should be checking your PPE every time you put it on or use it. If it’s been awhile since you’ve inspected the equipment you wear every day to keep yourself safe, take a few minutes to check it out. It won’t protect you as well as it should if it’s defective or worn. Always use your site’s complete safety checklists when inspecting equipment. Talk with your site supervisor or safety trainer for help determining if you should replace your equipment.

http://geotemps.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_OCT_Vol_2_Issue_7.pdf

Safety Bulletin – July 2013

WINNERS OF THE JOB SITE SAFETY EVENT!
THANK YOU to everyone who participated in the “Job Site Safety” event! We had some impressive responses. After much deliberation and discussion, the committee chose the following winners… DRUM ROLL PLEASE!!

1ST PLACE – JAYDEN SANDERS & MELINDA HOLGUIN ROAD WARRIOR EMERGENCY BAGS

2ND PLACE – RAPHAEL DREIER ULTRA PRO ADVENTURE MED KIT

Please continue to contact the Geotemps, Inc. Safety Committee with Safety Shares, Best Practices, Concerns, Questions

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_JUL_Vol_ 2_Issue_5.pdf

Safety Bulletin – June 2013

2012 METAL/NONMETAL MINES FATALITIES MSHA DATA REPORTS, 17 MINERS WERE KILLED IN ACCIDENTS IN THE METAL AND NONMETAL MINING INDUSTRY IN 2012.

  • • 3 miners died in machinery accidents.
  • • 3 died in fall of person accidents.
  • • 2 died as a result of falling material.
  • • 1 miner died from a fall of highwall.
  • • 1 miner died from a fall of rib.
  • • 6 miners died as a result of powered haulage accidents.
  • • 1 from Other types of accidents.

HERE ARE BRIEF SUMMARIES OF THE MACHINERY ACCIDENTS…

  • A 36-year-old foreman with about 9½ years of experience was killed at a sand and gravel operation. He was operating an excavator on a dike separating two ponds when the ground beneath the excavator tracks failed, toppling the excavator into one of the ponds.
  • A 79-year-old foreman with 56 years of experience was killed when he was run over by the dozer he was operating. The victim exited the cab and was on the left track checking the engine throttle linkage when the dozer moved forward.
  • A 30-year-old contract driller with 6 years of experience was killed at a common shale operation. The victim apparently attempted to thread a new drill steel manually, using a strap while the drill head was rotating. The rotating steel entangled him.

Surface Machinery Usage and Maintenance

(1) Ensure you are adequately task trained in all items assigned.

(2) Before performing any job, consider all hazards and implement formal procedures that address possible hazards.

(3) Ensure there is sufficient space around equipment to enable safe performance of work.

(4) Ensure power is off and the equipment is blocked against motion prior to performing maintenance.

(5) Avoid metal to metal contact because it slides much easier than wood or other materials against metal.

(6) Ensure all contact areas where jacks or other blocking materials are to be installed are free from grease or other substances to decrease the likelihood of shifting or sliding.

(7) Never use a hydraulic jack as the only tool for supporting large objects, massive weights, or objects that have the potential for the release of stored energy.

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_JUN_Vol_2_Issue_4.pdf

Safety Bulletin – April 2013

MSHA FATALGRAM METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY – On January 7, 2013, a 49-year old assistant plant manager with 30 years of experience was injured at a crushed stone operation. The victim was working on a lift, taking samples from a highwall, when a large rock fell and struck him. He was hospitalized and died on January 19, 2013.

Best Practices

  • • Establish and discuss safe work procedures for working near highwalls. Identify and control all hazards.
  • • Train all persons to recognize adverse conditions and environmental factors that can decrease highwall stability and understand safe job procedures to eliminate all hazards before beginning work.
  • • Look, Listen and Evaluate pit and highwall conditions daily, especially after each rain, freeze, or thaw.
  • • Remove loose or overhanging material from the face. Correct hazardous conditions by working from a safe location.
  • • Ensure that work or travel areas and equipment are a safe distance from the toe of the highwall.

“MSHA – Fatalgrams For the Metal/Nonmetal Mine Accident on January 7, 2013 – Fatality #1.” MSHA.gov.

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_APR_Vol_2_Issue_3.pdf

Safety Bulletin – March 2013

MSHA FATALGRAM METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY – On January 21, 2013, a 54-year old mechanic with 6 years of experience was killed at a lime operation. The victim went to a kiln pre-heat deck to repair a leaking hydraulic cylinder that activates a pusher arm on the kiln. He was caught between the corner of the angle iron and the plate connecting the push rods.

Best Practices

  • • Establish and discuss safe work procedures. Identify and control all hazards associated with the work to be performed along with the methods to properly protect persons.
  • • Task train all persons to recognize all potential hazardous conditions and understand safe job procedures to eliminate all hazards before beginning work.
  • • Require all persons to be positioned to prevent them from being exposed to any hazards. Monitor personnel to ensure safe work procedures, including lock out/ tag out and safe work positioning, are followed.

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_MAR_Vol_2_Issue_2.pdf

Safety Bulletin – February 2013

MSHA FATALGRAM METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY – On October 24, 2012, a 52-year old utility miner with 19 years of experience was killed on the surface of an underground limestone mine. He was operating a forklift, traveling on a decline toward the mine entrance, when the forklift went out of control. The forklift struck a concrete support for the belt conveyor and overturned, killing him.

Forklift accidents are on the rise!

Best Practices

1) Conduct adequate preoperational checks and ensure the service brakes are properly maintained and will stop and hold the mobile equipment prior to operating.

2) Ensure that mobile equipment operators are adequately task trained in all phases of mobile equipment operation before performing work.

3) Ensure the load is stable and secured on the forks of the forklift.

4) When descending a grade, operate the forklift with the load in the upgrade position.

5) Maintain control of self-propelled mobile equipment while it is in motion.

6) Operating speeds shall be consistent with conditions of roadways, tracks, grades, clearance, visibility, curves, and traffic.

7) Operate equipment within its designed limitations.

8) Slow down or drop to a lower gear when necessary.

9) Post speeds, especially in areas where lower speeds are warranted.

10) Always wear a seat belt when operating self-propelled mobile equipment.

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_FEB_Vol_2_Issue_1.pdf

Safety Bulletin – December 2012

MSHA FATALGRAM METAL/NONMETAL MINE FATALITY – On October 24, 2012, a 52-year old utility miner with 19 years of experience was killed on the surface of an underground limestone mine. He was operating a forklift, traveling on a decline toward the mine entrance, when the forklift went out of control. The forklift struck a concrete support for the belt conveyor and overturned, killing him.

Forklift accidents are on the rise!

Best Practices
1) Conduct adequate preoperational checks and ensure the service brakes are properly maintained and will stop and hold the mobile equipment prior to operating.

2) Ensure that mobile equipment operators are adequately task trained in all phases of mobile equipment operation before performing work.

3) Ensure the load is stable and secured on the forks of the forklift.

4) When descending a grade, operate the forklift with the load in the upgrade position.

5) Maintain control of self-propelled mobile equipment while it is in motion.

6) Operating speeds shall be consistent with conditions of roadways, tracks, grades, clearance, visibility, curves, and traffic.

7) Operate equipment within its designed limitations.

8) Slow down or drop to a lower gear when necessary.

9) Post speeds, especially in areas where lower speeds are warranted.

10) Always wear a seat belt when operating self-propelled mobile equipment.

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2012_DEC_Vol_1_Issue_1.pdf