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Safety Bulletin – June 2013

2012 METAL/NONMETAL MINES FATALITIES MSHA DATA REPORTS, 17 MINERS WERE KILLED IN ACCIDENTS IN THE METAL AND NONMETAL MINING INDUSTRY IN 2012.

  • • 3 miners died in machinery accidents.
  • • 3 died in fall of person accidents.
  • • 2 died as a result of falling material.
  • • 1 miner died from a fall of highwall.
  • • 1 miner died from a fall of rib.
  • • 6 miners died as a result of powered haulage accidents.
  • • 1 from Other types of accidents.

HERE ARE BRIEF SUMMARIES OF THE MACHINERY ACCIDENTS…

  • A 36-year-old foreman with about 9½ years of experience was killed at a sand and gravel operation. He was operating an excavator on a dike separating two ponds when the ground beneath the excavator tracks failed, toppling the excavator into one of the ponds.
  • A 79-year-old foreman with 56 years of experience was killed when he was run over by the dozer he was operating. The victim exited the cab and was on the left track checking the engine throttle linkage when the dozer moved forward.
  • A 30-year-old contract driller with 6 years of experience was killed at a common shale operation. The victim apparently attempted to thread a new drill steel manually, using a strap while the drill head was rotating. The rotating steel entangled him.

Surface Machinery Usage and Maintenance

(1) Ensure you are adequately task trained in all items assigned.

(2) Before performing any job, consider all hazards and implement formal procedures that address possible hazards.

(3) Ensure there is sufficient space around equipment to enable safe performance of work.

(4) Ensure power is off and the equipment is blocked against motion prior to performing maintenance.

(5) Avoid metal to metal contact because it slides much easier than wood or other materials against metal.

(6) Ensure all contact areas where jacks or other blocking materials are to be installed are free from grease or other substances to decrease the likelihood of shifting or sliding.

(7) Never use a hydraulic jack as the only tool for supporting large objects, massive weights, or objects that have the potential for the release of stored energy.

http://geoweb.blackbuffer.com/PDF/safety/SB_2013_JUN_Vol_2_Issue_4.pdf